Unclassified

CITY BIKE DEPOT - BIKE DEPOT


City Bike Depot - X Moto Bike.



City Bike Depot





city bike depot






    city bike
  • A European city bike, or simply city bike is a bicycle designed for frequent short, moderately paced rides through relatively flat urban areas. It is a form of utility bicycle commonly seen around the world, built to facilitate everyday riding in normal clothes in a variety of weather conditions.





    depot
  • A place where buses, trains, or other vehicles are housed and maintained and from which they are dispatched for service

  • terminal: station where transport vehicles load or unload passengers or goods

  • A place for the storage of large quantities of equipment, food, or some other commodity

  • DEPOT is an acronym for Distributed Ensemble of Pages that is Outage Tolerant. It is an open source project, developed at IIT Bombay.

  • A railroad or bus station

  • storehouse: a depository for goods; "storehouses were built close to the docks"











city bike depot - Urban Flow:




Urban Flow: Bike Messengers and the City


Urban Flow: Bike Messengers and the City



Bike messengers are familiar figures in the downtown cores of major cities. Tasked with delivering time-sensitive materials within, at most, a few hours-and sometimes in as little as fifteen minutes-these couriers ride in all types of weather, weave in and out of dense traffic, dodging (or sometimes failing to dodge) taxis and pedestrians alike in order to meet their clients' tight deadlines. Riding through midtown traffic at breakneck speeds is dangerous work, and most riders do it for very little pay and few benefits. As the courier industry has felt the pressures of first fax machines, then e-mails, and finally increased opportunities for electronic filing of legal "paperwork," many of those who remain in the business are devoted to their job. For these couriers, messengering is the foundation for an all-encompassing lifestyle, an essential part of their identity. In Urban Flow, Jeffrey L. Kidder (a sociologist who spent several years working as a bike messenger) introduces readers to this fascinating subculture, exploring its appeal as well as its uncertainties and dangers.
Through interviews with and observation of messengers at work and play, Kidder shows how many become acclimated to the fast-paced, death-defying nature of the job, often continuing to ride with the same sense of purpose off the clock. In chaotic bike races called alleycats, messengers careen through the city in hopes of beating their peers to the finish line. Some messengers travel the world to take part in these events, and the top prizes are often little more than bragging rights. Taken together, the occupation and the messengers' after-hours pursuits highlight a creative subculture inextricably linked to the urban environment. The work of bike messengers is intense and physically difficult. It requires split-second reflexes, an intimate knowledge of street maps and traffic patterns, and a significant measure of courage in the face of both bodily harm and job insecurity. In Urban Flow, Kidder gives readers a rare opportunity to catch more than a fleeting glimpse of these habitues of city streets.

Bike messengers are familiar figures in the downtown cores of major cities. Tasked with delivering time-sensitive materials within, at most, a few hours-and sometimes in as little as fifteen minutes-these couriers ride in all types of weather, weave in and out of dense traffic, dodging (or sometimes failing to dodge) taxis and pedestrians alike in order to meet their clients' tight deadlines. Riding through midtown traffic at breakneck speeds is dangerous work, and most riders do it for very little pay and few benefits. As the courier industry has felt the pressures of first fax machines, then e-mails, and finally increased opportunities for electronic filing of legal "paperwork," many of those who remain in the business are devoted to their job. For these couriers, messengering is the foundation for an all-encompassing lifestyle, an essential part of their identity. In Urban Flow, Jeffrey L. Kidder (a sociologist who spent several years working as a bike messenger) introduces readers to this fascinating subculture, exploring its appeal as well as its uncertainties and dangers.
Through interviews with and observation of messengers at work and play, Kidder shows how many become acclimated to the fast-paced, death-defying nature of the job, often continuing to ride with the same sense of purpose off the clock. In chaotic bike races called alleycats, messengers careen through the city in hopes of beating their peers to the finish line. Some messengers travel the world to take part in these events, and the top prizes are often little more than bragging rights. Taken together, the occupation and the messengers' after-hours pursuits highlight a creative subculture inextricably linked to the urban environment. The work of bike messengers is intense and physically difficult. It requires split-second reflexes, an intimate knowledge of street maps and traffic patterns, and a significant measure of courage in the face of both bodily harm and job insecurity. In Urban Flow, Kidder gives readers a rare opportunity to catch more than a fleeting glimpse of these habitues of city streets.










76% (8)





2011 Tour de Troit




2011 Tour de Troit





Cyclists gather in Roosevelt Park near the former Michigan Central Depot, a 1913 monument to a long-fallen Michigan Central railroad empire. Notice the Ambassador Bridge in the background to the left of the photo. Both structures are part of the Matty Moroun trucking empire.

The cyclists are getting ready to ride in the annual Tour de Detroit bicycle tour. 4,251 cyclists rode routes of either 25 or 62 miles through the city.











2011 Tour de Troit




2011 Tour de Troit





Cyclists gather in Roosevelt Park in front of the former Michigan Central Depot for the start of the 2011 Tour de Troit. The fellow in the center of the photo is looking up at the station which is perhaps one of Detroit's most famous ruins.

The cyclists are getting ready to ride in the annual Tour de Detroit bicycle tour. 4,251 cyclists rode routes of either 25 or 62 miles through the city.









city bike depot







See also:

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exercise bikes for kids

where to buy cheap bikes

choppers bikes

gt bike dealers

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bmx bicycle reviews

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boys 12 inch bikes



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